Thursday, 21 February 2013

Which breakfast cereals have Monsanto GM corn in them?

By now, nearly everyone interested in healthy living is aware of the recent research linking Monsanto's GMO corn to cancer tumors and an increase risk of premature death in both men and women. News of the research is spreading like wildfire across the 'net, and support for Proposition 37 -- which seeks to label GMOs in foods -- is growing by the day.

But the media has not yet reported on the everyday foods being sold in grocery stores right now and made with Monsanto's genetically modified corn (GM corn). Which foods are most likely to contain Monsanto GM corn? To answer this question, I visited a local grocery store in Austin, Texas and purchased 10 breakfast cereals made with high levels of non-organic corn.

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Wednesday, 20 February 2013

New Cancer Wonder Drugs actually spreads tumours to bones

New cancer 'wonder' drugs trigger cancer spread to bones

Most cancer drugs are used to hopefully kill tumors and keep malignancies from spreading. Unfortunately, new research from the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis raises serious concerns that Big Pharma's highly touted class of cancer drugs known as IAP antagonists actually increases the risk of tumors spreading to bone.
"These investigational drugs are getting broad attention right now because they seem to be very effective against primary tumors," senior author Deborah V. Novack, MD, PhD, associate professor of medicine, said in a media statement "There is also excitement because until now, these drugs have not appeared to have major side effects."

However, the study by Novack and her research team (just published in the journal Cancer Discovery) reveals that while the IAP drugs target a protein that makes tumors vulnerable to death, the same protein also over-activates cells called osteoclasts which are responsible for tearing down bone. The risk for patients? Potentially, IAPs can trigger the bone weakening disease osteoporosis and, even more worrisome, they may cause metastasis of cancer to the bones.

Numerous IAP antagonists are already in early clinical trials against breast, lung, pancreatic, ovarian, prostate, liver, skin and blood cancers. While these phase one or two clinical trials look at the short-term safety and effectiveness of new drugs, the researchers say they may not catch bone metastasis. "These trials do not necessarily look for long-term effects of the drugs," Chang Yang, MD, PhD, staff scientist and the paper's first author said in the press statement. "If the cancer is going to metastasize to bone, it may take six months to two years to see that outcome. This may not be seen during the clinical trial."

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Friday, 8 February 2013

Living in an ensouled Universe

Living in an Ensouled Universe

Linda George, Contributing Writer
We exist in a system where our beliefs are continually manipulated to induce a programmed ‘reality’ – one we are conditioned to accept is reality.  It is the ‘reality’ of the physical, five-sensory, finite world. In reality, reality is not this! In reality, we are living in an ensouled universe – a universe immersed and enfolded in Soul. It is a compassionate, creative, intelligent living being, this universe of ours. And it has our ultimate wellbeing at heart. The ancients knew this. We have largely forgotten – or rather, been convinced otherwise.

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The End of Europe.

Thursday, 7 February 2013

Banned TSA Video

The Sour Sop Can Kill Cancer

The Sour Sop or the fruit from the graviola tree is a miraculous natural cancer cell killer which is 10,000 times stronger than Chemo.

The Catholic University of South Korea reports that Graviola was shown to selectively target the cancer cells, leaving healthy cells untouched. Unlike chemotherapy which is great news. 

Natural cures not medicine!

Evidence that the universe is a computer simulation

Yet more evidence emerges that the universe is a computer simulation

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Fantastic video from Prison Planet Here

Is the Universe a Computer Simulation? (Video)

Monday, 4 February 2013

Alan Watts - Death & Nothingness (HD)

Introduction to Zen

A short article that serves as an introduction to Zen.

zen buddhism
Rooted in the present ... Zen Buddhism puts the emphasis on now. Photograph: Barbara Walton/EPA
Ever since I was a child, I have been acutely sensitive to the idea – in the way that other people seem to feel only after bereavement or some shocking unexpected event – that the human intellect is unable, finally, to make sense of the world: everything is contradiction and paradox, and no one really knows much for sure, however loudly they profess to the contrary.
It is an uncomfortable mindset, and as a result I have always felt the need to build a conceptual box in my mind big enough to fit the world into. Most people seem to have a talent for denying or ignoring life's contradictions, as the demands of work and life take them over. Or they fall for an ideology, perhaps religious or political, that appears to render the world a comprehensible place.
I have never been able to support either strategy. A sense of encroaching mental chaos was always skulking at the edges of my life. Which is perhaps why I fell into an acute depression at the age of 27, and didn't recover for several years.
The consequence of this was my first book, a memoir called The Scent of Dried Roses. While I was researching it, I read the work of psychologist Dorothy Rowe, a quiet, almost secret, follower of Buddhist philosophy.
Through Rowe's writing I first came across Alan Watts, and he sounded like an unlikely philosopher. His name evoked the image of a paper goods sales rep on a small regional industrial estate. But through Watts and his writing, I was exposed directly to the ideas of Zen Buddhism. I was suspicious at first, perceiving Zen Buddhism to be a religion rather than a philosophy. I wasn't interested in the Four Noble Truths, or the Eightfold Path, and I certainly didn't believe in karma or reincarnation.
All the same, I read a couple of Watts's books. They made a significant impact on me. The Meaning of Happiness (published in 1940) and The Wisdom of Insecurity (1951) are striking primers to his work, and they underlined what Rowe was already teaching me: that life had no intrinsic meaning, any more than a piece of music had an intrinsic point. Life was, in zen parlance, yugen – a kind of elevated purposelessness.
The word "zen" is a Japanese way of pronouncing "chan", which is the Chinese way of pronouncing the Indian Sanskrit "dhyana" or "sunya", meaning emptiness or void. This is the basis of zen itself – that all life and existence is based on a kind of dynamic emptiness (a view now supported by modern science, which sees phenomena at a sub-atomic level popping in and out of existence in a quantum froth).
In this view, there is no stuff, no difference between matter and energy. Look at anything closely enough – even a rock or a table – and you will see that it is an event, not a thing. Every thing is, in truth, happening. This too, accords with modern scientific knowledge. Furthermore, there is not a multiplicity of events. There is just one event, with multiple aspects, unfolding. We are not just separate egos locked in bags of skin. We come out of the world, not into it. We are each expressions of the world, not strangers in a strange land, flukes of consciousness in a blind, stupid universe, as evolutionary science teaches us.
The emphasis on the present moment is perhaps zen's most distinctive characteristic. In our western relationship with time, in which we compulsively pick over the past in order to learn lessons from it, and then project into a hypothetical future in which those lessons can be applied, the present moment has been compressed to a tiny sliver on the clock face between a vast past and an infinite future. Zen, more than anything else, is about reclaiming and expanding the present moment.
It tries to have you understand, without arguing the point, that there is no purpose in getting anywhere if, when you get there, all you do is think about getting to some other future moment. Life exists in the present, or nowhere at all, and if you cannot grasp that you are simply living a fantasy.
For all zen writers, life is, as it was for Shakespeare, akin to a dream – transitory and insubstantial. There is no "rock of ages cleft for me". There is no security. Looking for security, Watts said, is like jumping off a cliff while holding on to a rock for safety – an absurd illusion. Everything passes and you must die. Don't waste your time thinking otherwise. Neither Buddha nor his zen followers had time for any notion of an afterlife. The doctrine of reincarnation can be more accurately thought about as a constant rebirth, of death throughout life, and the continual coming and going of universal energy, of which we are all part, before and after death.
• This is an extract from Aeon Magazine, a new digital magazine which publishes a free original essay every weekday on science, art, nature and culture. You can read Tim Lott's essay on Zen Buddhism and Alan Watts in full here.

GMO A Go Go - Truth about GMOs explained in new animated cartoon

Alan Watts - The Now (HD)